Punic and wild

Imagine the coasts drawn on an ancient geographical map, where borders between the mainland and the sea are soft lines not yet contaminated by the cities.

Piscinnì Tower - Ph. Gianfranco Zedda

Piscinnì Tower - Ph. Gianfranco Zedda

Then go to the far south of Sardinia, along the coast road which, just like in the map, hides treasures never reported by cartographers.

Between Porto Teulada and Capo Spartivento you could do a continuous treasure hunt among Aragonese watchtowers and panoramic inlets often reachable only on foot. You are in Domus de Maria, a town proud of having two types of sea: on the one hand, the famous beaches of Chia, a destination for pink flamingos and kitesurfing enthusiasts.

Ph. Gianfranco Zedda

Ph. Gianfranco Zedda

On the other hand, 12 km away, a series of unpolluted and isolated coves, well hidden along the spectacular “South Coast road”, which glides between the turquoise sea and the lush green of the Mediterranean vegetation. In one day you could collect dives from a myriad of beaches. Just park and hike for a few minutes to find yourself in small heavenly worlds, nestled between rock and sand.

Piscinnì beach - Ph. Enrico Nocera

Piscinnì beach - Ph. Enrico Nocera

Do not lose hope if you have the feeling of not being able to see even one of these Caribbean corners. Sooner or later, between one bend and another, a tropical oasis will appear from the window. It is Piscinnì, or Pixinnì, as it is written in Sardinian, so named from the homonymous tower that dominates the bay. Two hundred meters of soft, very white sand bathed by crystal clear, blue and transparent water, with a seabed that slopes gently towards the open sea.

In summer the sandy shore is full of tourists looking for wild beaches, while in the other months it is a place of relaxation for grazing cows and goats. This sugar tongue, in fact, separates the sea from a pond, usually dry in summer, rich in vegetation and which has become a site of community interest. A fun for the flocks!

Ph. Enrico Nocera

Ph. Enrico Nocera

Yet here nature has been violated, as reflected in the square shapes of the rock and the flat surfaces of the cliff. First the Carthaginians and then the Romans extracted blocks of sandstone to be used in the construction of buildings. A scar of over 2,500 years, which today the seductive and Punic Piscinnì exhibits with charm.

Mario Vella - Sea

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